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The hammer …..

 

Facebook is dominating the U.S. display ad market, according to data from comScore

In Q3 2010, Facebook served 297 billion display ad impressions giving it 23% of the U.S. market for display ads. In the first quarter of 2009, it only had a 7% share.

Yahoo came in a distant second place for Q3 2010 with 141 billion display ads and 11% of the market.

As you can see in the chart below, Facebook’s share of the display market has that “hockey-stick” growth, which should be scaring Yahoo, Google, and AOL.

chart of the day, share of online ad impressions, nov 2010
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The nail

Facebook is reportedly set to reveal its own email application on Monday.

If Facebook’s email service is a success, it’s bad news for Yahoo and AOL, which are already losing users. It’s also bad news for Google, which uses Gmail as a launch point into search, Google Apps, and to small degree social stuff through Buzz.

What would it take for Facebook email to be a success? Well, Facebook has 150 million active users in the United States. It’s unlikely to convert all those users, but if it can get just a third of them to start using its email, it would have the second most popular email service in the U.S.

Below, we’ve charted the monthly uniques for each big email service. For some context we also charted how many overall uniques Facebook gets.

chart of the day, facebook, email sites, nov 2010

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Value of time relative to Internet video vs traditional TV

Some interesting insights but probably not anything most of us did not already know. Generational behavior shifts are pretty obvious to everyone. Time/Convenience = Value equation is also pretty apparent.

Revenue sharing, subscription licensing and advertising will clearly not deliver the revenue/margins needed to acquire the linear and non-linear content to feed the 12 second attention spans of the channel surfing masses & YouTube insomniacs.

The question dujour is how to compete with cable. The answer is by getting relevant. This means unlocking the Multimedia and Entertainment Kingdoms to get relevant content? Scaling long tail content is not the answer and delivering it in more innovative and nontraditional ways is not transformative? Ask Apple, Amazon and Netflix.

My assertion is that Media 2.0 companies will fast follow Comcast/NBC into a vertically integrated model to leverage price points for multichannel distribution and carriage agreements. Interactive advertising, gaming, Network PVR, and three screen viewing are just nice concierge services but without relative content to hold your attention over a significant period of time/day what does it matter.

The argument is pervasive.  Kids don't want or need cable.  They have the internet for content. Why would they pay all that money when they can find most, if not all the entertainment they want and need for free ? Put another way "kids today", the twentysomethings,  dont follow the same entertainment consumption paths that their parents and elders do.  The new mantra is "Never trust the media consumption habits of anyone over 30" Well no shit She … Read More

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Out of The Box meets Over The Top

Sony Introduces Google Internet TV And Blu-ray Player – HotHardware

Most interesting to the incumbents like Cable, AT&T and Verizon but also to the OTT players like Netflix, Amazon, and device manufacturers like Tivo, Boxee and Roku. Clearly the rules are changing in the marketplace and this will shake out some new dynamics for syndication and content delivery which makes Comcast acquisition of NBC universal even smarter.
But maybe not as smart as having your first OTT partner Sony. With its major content, partners and distribution channels Sony is a major accelerant for GoogleTV.

Expect the wave of content acquisitions to accelerate this year for those with large cash reserves. Advertising device reach is “everything” for the moment and will pay dividend multiples when targeted and interactive advertising is mainstreamed.

Streaming, syncing and linking

With all of the news from Googles I/O event this week and with GoogleTV taking the lead story, I think this acquisition of Simplify-Media may have slipped by most of the media and googleotti. But I believe the Simplify-Media acquisition will accelerate Google’s delivery of a converged cross-platform solution that could be best of bread in the marketplace.

The key benefit of acquiring Simplify-Media is quite obvious, streaming music. Apple whom already provides syncing and linking to music via iTunes and dominates the music market is keenly aware of the benefits of streaming music or music you already own. Especially to wireless devices and TV’s thus the recent announcement to acquire LaLa was also a great acquisition for Apple.

I beleive GoogleTV will lead the marketplace by also rolling out the streaming video. Most likely in the form of a Personal Video Recorder (same as a network DVR) & Video on Demand for the TV, Mobile and Desktop. Integrating in You-Tube, Picassa, Gmail, Buzz will round out the social enablement of media across mobile, desktop, and TV. This makes for a very compelling consumer experience far beyond the Triple Play Bundle or TV Everywhere initatives and all riding on someone elses IP network at significantly decreased cost for Google.

But don’t count the Cable MSO’s or Apple yet as the advertising dollars are very significant to their revenue streams and future. Competition is good! It drives innovation and a better consumer experience. So code on my friends!